five essentials : on champagne

Celebrations for graduations, engagements, proposals, when the clock strikes midnight, champagne seems to be the drink of choice to seal an event along with smiles and laughs. And as Madame de Pompadour so rightfully said, “champagne is the only wine that leaves a woman beautiful after drinking it.”
{origins}
A light sparkling wine is made in the Champagne region of northeastern France. It is made only of the pinot meunier, pinot noir, or champagne grapes. The bubbles glisten from your bottle to your glass due to the fermentation period and the natural dust particles in your glass. 
{chilling}
Champagne should always be served chilled as opened warm usually causes the bubbles to exhausted much too quickly. The ideal temperature is 40 to 45 F and should be chilled only a few hours in advance of using it. Chilling few days ahead of time causes the cork to shrink and may taint the flavor of the champagne. And for a last minute guest arrival, a bucket of ice and water plus a tablespoon of salt will chill your champagne to perfection in just 15 minutes. And if that is not a possibility, placing in the freezer wrapped in plastic wrap for 15 minutes is second best.
{opening}
Gently remove the foil and untwist the cage, but do not remove it. Holding the base of the bottle with your opposite hand, twist both ends in opposite directions. This will help loosen the cork. If you don’t want to pop the champagne, hold the cork in when you feel the pressure. Once the pressure is released continue twisting until the cork is free. Pour into un-chilled champagne flutes or white wine glass holding them upright.  
{glasses}
A tall vessel like champagne flutes or wine glasses are ideal. They should be filled two-thirds of the way as that is the best possible way to keep the bubbles intact. Since they are, after all, the most fun. Coupes should be avoided as they tend to flatten the champagne much too quickly and frankly are not the best for dinner parties as they are prone to spilling. 
{storing}
Unopened champagne bottles should be stored in room temperature with minimal sunlight for two to three years. The sunlight and heat can have a negative effect on the champagne. Bottles should be consumed once opened, but can be reserved for a recipe like champagne risotto and keeps for at least a week with a specialized cap.
  • NG

    love the post and the picture selection is perfect !

    -Neha

    loveplayingdressup.com

  • NG

    love the post and the picture selection is perfect !

    -Neha

    loveplayingdressup.com

  • Short and Sweet Blog

    Such great fun tips! Now I want an excuse to have a glass of champagne! 😉

  • Short and Sweet Blog

    Such great fun tips! Now I want an excuse to have a glass of champagne! 😉

  • Great post, Supal! I must say that champagne is the only alcoholic drink I’ve been missing since getting pregnant – I just love what it represents, the taste, the memories a particular brand evokes… Does this make me sound very posh? 😉

  • Great post, Supal! I must say that champagne is the only alcoholic drink I've been missing since getting pregnant – I just love what it represents, the taste, the memories a particular brand evokes… Does this make me sound very posh? 😉

  • Thanks, Neha! x

  • HAHA you do sound posh, but it's more of an indulgence! x

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