moroccan feast with La Maison Arabe

{a moroccan feast with La Maison Arabe} via chevrons & éclairs

culinary adventure

My parents cultivated a strong loving bond with my brother and I around the kitchen island. Our home growing up had an open plan kitchen, breakfast nook and family living room-and even the most important guests that came to visit would still be invited to sit in the family room, where we felt the most comfortable and where my mom could seamlessly prepare an incredible multi-course meal whilst entertaining.

My fondest childhood memories always included food, something prepared by the hands of my parents, and still today they tend to cook together. It’s what brings us together…

On mine and my brother’s first full day in Marrakech, we were invited by La Maison Arabe to a private cooking class that truly was unforgettable. Since I lived in the Middle East, I attempted to cook Moroccan ravines, but this 1-day class provided a thorough (thoughtfully done with brevity) course on the derivatives of Moroccan cuisine. What made it truly special from any other cuisine in the world.
 

{a moroccan feast with La Maison Arabe} via chevrons & éclairs {a moroccan feast with La Maison Arabe} via chevrons & éclairs
{a moroccan feast with La Maison Arabe} via chevrons & éclairs
{a moroccan feast with La Maison Arabe} via chevrons & éclairs
{a moroccan feast with La Maison Arabe} via chevrons & éclairs
{a moroccan feast with La Maison Arabe} via chevrons & éclairs {a moroccan feast with La Maison Arabe} via chevrons & éclairs

base spices & herbs

Moroccan cuisine is a combination of Berber, Arab, Jewish (think preserved lemon) and Moorish (the Islamic empire from Spain) cuisines. The spice trade to colonialism to the tribes have all influenced the gastronomy of such a rich country.

Bread being the fork and knife of the cuisine, you can see where colonialist elements seeped into the Moroccan traditions.

You will find black and white pepper used brought from India, dried and ground ginger that is slightly sweet and subtly spicy, turmeric for color, dried cumin for salads and omelettes and lamb, sweet paprika, harissa chili for a touch more of spice, cinnamon to caramelize dried fruits and onions, ras el hanout is the garam masala of the country with each family and region with its own variations, saffron for a royal layer, orange blossom in the desserts as well as rosewater and argan oil.
 

{a moroccan feast with La Maison Arabe} via chevrons & éclairs
{a moroccan feast with La Maison Arabe} via chevrons & éclairs {a moroccan feast with La Maison Arabe} via chevrons & éclairs

what I wore

top c/o BODEN skirt c/o BODEN shoes c/o BODEN sunglasses c/o BODEN

The moment we started cooking in the tagine, a conical clay pot from North Africa that traditionally was cooked inside a baker’s oven is conical clay pot that is filled with meat, dried fruits and spices to create an entree. The aromas of each ingredient flirted with the next ingredient that was added into the tagine. The pungent olive oil, the onion then the garlic. This is the moment where I wish my photos had scratch-and-sniff capabilities.

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La Maison Arabe

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{a moroccan feast with La Maison Arabe} via chevrons & éclairs
{a moroccan feast with La Maison Arabe} via chevrons & éclairs
{a moroccan feast with La Maison Arabe} via chevrons & éclairs
{a moroccan feast with La Maison Arabe} via chevrons & éclairs {a moroccan feast with La Maison Arabe} via chevrons & éclairs {a moroccan feast with La Maison Arabe} via chevrons & éclairs

the menu

Moroccan cuisine is known for its assortment of salads, not just the ravines. For the winter months you will find salads that are warm and more hearty. In the warmer months, more pickling is done. We made 2 salads:

taktuka salad

which is a tomato and pepper salad that is earthy and natural. I found extremely refreshing and lovely with extra olive oil.

zaalook salad

a warm aubergine salad with garlic. Not being too big of an aubergine fan, my brother devoured it everytime we had it during the trip.

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You can right click on the recipe card to save directly to your computer.
Print on a 3 x 5 index card setting and store with the rest of your recipes.
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{a moroccan feast with La Maison Arabe} via chevrons & éclairs
{a moroccan feast with La Maison Arabe} via chevrons & éclairs

chicken tagine with preserved lemon & olives

For our entree, we made a chicken tagine with preserved lemon and olives. This dish drew elements from all the communities that makes the populace so unique in Morocco. With preserved lemon from the Jewish heritage, to saffron from the Spanish Islamic empire, to the olives of the Mediterranean influence. It was a refreshing dish for a warm afternoon meal.

milk pastilla

Finally, the dessert was the milk pastilla. A slightly floral flavored, milky dessert that was topped with almonds, cinnamon and powdered sugar. It was a very simple dessert that had my brother asking for it for breakfast each morning too.

* * *
You can right click on the recipe card to save directly to your computer.
Print on a 3 x 5 index card setting and store with the rest of your recipes.
For more recipe, visit the recipe index here!
 

{a moroccan feast with La Maison Arabe} via chevrons & éclairs {a moroccan feast with La Maison Arabe} via chevrons & éclairs
{a moroccan feast with La Maison Arabe} via chevrons & éclairs

  • Sarah

    Beautiful outfits, Supal! Please visit me and help me make these dishes, they look divine! x

  • The place looks amazing and the food absolutely mouthwatering!

    Vanessa x | http://www.springlilies.com

  • Tiffany {A Touch of Grace}

    What an amazing experience, to take a cooking class in a different country! All the meals you prepared look amazing. And doing it with your brother; so cool!

    • Oh definitely! I used to do it quite a bit when I went backpacking because it’s a great way to meet people and understand the history and culture. My brother and I LOVE cooking (he used to work at a fast dining restaurant as a chef)-the kitchen is where we were brought up since my parents love cooking and hosting <3

  • Paige Allison

    Seeing that those green heels are a kitten heel makes me love them even more! I hate high heels nowadays. So here’s my plan: I’ll invite myself over to your mama’s for some of this amazing food (or even your place since you took the cooking lesson) and you sit me by your brother, mmmk? I’ll be drooling over him and the food, so it will be perfect.

    • They are so comfortable! The bands are a bit elasticated so it helps with moving around. And I do wear heels, but with commutes it can get tricky-so I only do it when I’m taking ubers all day/night ha. YES, most likely my mom will just force you to come over (bring your thanksgiving pants). HAHAHAHAH best/creepiest comment.

  • Mademoiselle Coconath

    The pictures are gorgeous! Great post
    xx
    Mademoiselle Coconath
    http://mllecoconath.com

  • Leah

    Look at those beautiful roses! What are they made of? I love your outfit, I’m assuming you cooked in it? Only you would ; ) xxx

    • Haha they are made out of tomato peel and were rather difficult to do… it was the absolute WORST… but glad they turned out okay 🙂 And yes haha I did cook in it and had anxiety levels rise significantly when we started the soupy parts xx

  • I’m still jealous you got to go to Morocco with your brother. 😛

    But seriously – that trip sounds so amazing and I also wish the photos had scratch and sniff capabilities.

  • Stephanie

    Im going to marrakech in a few weeks and I am enjoying your trip!! Going to email La Maison Arabe to book my cooking course. Thank you!

  • Such beautiful photos! Looks like a wonderful experience
    Lyndi xo

    http://www.stylecalling.com