a simple thanksgiving

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♫♪ Jack Johnson – Banana Pancakes

Though thanksgiving is much of an American holiday where families come together to celebrate the end of this season and welcoming the winter, and though my readers are quite evenly split between American and international, I still enjoy thanksgiving. To me, this holiday is about enjoying the company of others. Not necessarily only family as last year I spent it far from my family in the comfort of my friends in Scotland. There is no need of a turkey or side dishes or desserts, but warmth and comfort. And so this post is very much an invitation to you to c&é’s thanksgiving gathering topped with good food, great libations and even better company.

I will be taking the rest of the week off as I need some much needed rejuvenation and I am planning on hosting a few friends before the weekend hits. I will see you next Monday with holiday inspiration galore! Happy thanksgiving, from me to you. xo, S.

 

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{images from Style Me Pretty | photographed by White Loft Studio}

baked ricotta with mediterranean gremolata

{baked ricotta with mediterranean gremolata} via chevrons & éclairs{baked ricotta with mediterranean gremolata} via chevrons & éclairs{baked ricotta with mediterranean gremolata} via chevrons & éclairs{baked ricotta with mediterranean gremolata} via chevrons & éclairs _2551{baked ricotta with mediterranean gremolata} via chevrons & éclairs{baked ricotta with mediterranean gremolata} via chevrons & éclairs

A friend recently asked me where I come up with my recipes. Not just the recipe, but the idea in which what to cook or bake. She tells me how from one week to another, my recipes are so different. And at first, I never really understood what she meant by how I plan on sharing, but soon realized it was my curation of some favorite food blogs that constantly inspired me as well as the season’s fresh fruits and vegetables.

This recipe is a combination of both, inspired by a food blog and the season’s freshest ingredients. The baked ricotta is original by HonestlyYUM, you can {find Todd and Karen’s recipe here}. And you can find the mediterranean gremolata recipe below! Also, this makes a great appetizer for when you’re hosting your friends and family over the Thanksgiving holiday!

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{mediterranean gremolata} via chevrons & éclairs

Click on the image to enlarge the recipe.
Print on a 3 x 5 index card setting and store with the rest of your recipes.
For more recipe, visit the recipe index here!

21 November 2014

{21 november 2014} via chevrons & éclairs
{21 november 2014} via chevrons & éclairs
{21 november 2014} via chevrons & éclairs {21 november 2014} via chevrons & éclairs
{21 november 2014} via chevrons & éclairs
{21 november 2014} via chevrons & éclairs

♫♪ Melody Gardot – Your Heart Is As Black As Night

I may be one of those people who complains, rather exaggerates, that the week has been busy. Something I’m not used it is pre-work meetings and post-work drinks and dinners. Day are often busy with people and very little time is spent on myself. Every weekend there is a visitor as London is quite a transit city. Honestly, I’ve been loving every second of it. And though I need to just stop and breathe, it’s that time of the year where those moments are hard to come by.

As you may have noticed from my social media channels, I found a new flat that is utterly perfect in every way and in my favorite area of London. So this past week, in the midst of all that is going on, I have been moving and organizing. It’s quite a feat when you’re on your own and learning the intricacies of a new place. Luckily, I’ve had great support and the move was quite seamless, minus the fact that I was a bit overwhelmed by how many coats I have! You don’t really notice these things until you have to move, don’t you?

Anyways, I will be cutting it short for this {weekend note} as I have a friend coming over for a bit of takeout and a film. Then another {very, very close} friend is visiting tomorrow and I am excited for an afternoon of tea, cakes and Christmas windows. How is your weekend looking?

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a guide to mushroom foraging

kabocha squash salad recipe

a feature on my instagram + a round-up!

deco glam flat in the west village

join the conversation | seek more inspiration | follow my weekend

tips on men’s watches

of all things black and white stripes

banana-date bread with cardamom frosting

5 unique tips for baking the perfect pie

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{photographs of Spear Mews in London}

baking pies made easy

{strawberry-hazelnut galette} via chevrons & éclairs

That time of the year is upon us, and though I’m in a completely different country, Thanksgiving still is a special time for us all to come together. Celebrate family and friends. Cherish the moments. Enjoy the food. This year, I thought I would bring together my favorite food bloggers to give us their best kept tip when preparing {the best part of any meal} dessert. And since it’s the holiday of turkey and stuffing and maple essence and hints of cinnamon, a few tips to keep in mind when baking the perfect Thanksgiving pie.

{melissa, the fauxmartha}

When you’re planning a big Thanksgiving meal, dessert can often end up on the back burner. My advice—plan ahead because there’s nothing better than a homemade dessert. Most desserts benefit from a good rest, so make it the day before the big meal. Use the freezer where you can. If you’re making a pie, prep the crust a week or two in advance and store (wrapped in a layer of plastic wrap and foil, then placed in a plastic bag) in the freezer. If you’re making a cake, bake the layers a week or two in advance and store in the same way.

Melissa’s recipe to try: maple pumpkin pie

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{karen & todd, honestlyYUM}

When transferring your rolled out pie crust into your pan, loosely roll the flat dough around your rolling pin, like a paper towel roll, and then unravel the dough into your pie tin by lining the edge of the dough onto the lip of the pie pan and unroll across the pan. For years I lifted the dough with my hands and it always ended in a mess. With this tip you preserve your perfectly rolled out dough!

Karen & Todd’s recipe to try: chocolate pecan pie with bourbon maple whip cream

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{christina, dessert for two}

I think my best tip is to only add half the water the dough recipe calls for. Start to work the dough together, and if it feels too dry, slowly add more water.

Christina’s recipe to try: Orange Spice Coconut Pumpkin Pie

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{michelle, hummingbird high}

If you’ve had a problem with a soggy pie crust in the past, try this trick: replace the water in the recipe with the same quantity of ice cold vodka. What causes soggy pie crusts is the overworking of water and flour together — this causes too much gluten, and too much gluten will make things soggy. Vodka, however, evaporates faster than water during the baking process and therefore won’t bind as much with the gluten molecules in the flour {but will still give you the necessary moisture needed to bring the crust together}.

Michelle’s recipe to try: chocolate and pumpkin pie

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{a favorite c&é tip}

Use rice flour to roll out the dough. The reason for this tip is that the flour, since it is non-gluten, doesn’t contribute to the dough’s toughness. Just sprinkle and spread around a bit on your working surface and rub a bit on your rolling pin too. Roll out your dough and it will bit a bit sandy, but it won’t stick to the dough as much.

Supal’s recipe to try: persimmon-plum galette

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Do you have any tips or ideas for when you’re baking pies? Please do share!

banana-date bread with cardamom icing

{banana-date bread with cardamom cream cheese icing}
{banana-date bread with cardamom cream cheese icing}{banana-date bread with cardamom cream cheese icing} {banana-date bread with cardamom cream cheese icing}{banana-date bread with cardamom cream cheese icing}{banana-date bread with cardamom cream cheese icing}{banana-date bread with cardamom cream cheese icing}

For all my Indian readers and followers, you will be able to relate to this post. For some reason, most Indians {especially the women} have this utter fondness for dried dates and figs. My mother is one in that line as well. She often finds recipes that include raisins or any other dried fruit and replaces it with dried dates or figs. A personal favorite is cinnamon-raisin date cookies. And so in leu of nuts, I thought I would go with dates: a sweeter, softer alternative. And quite a nutty contrast with the cardamom in the icing.

Mummy, this one is for you!

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14162263974_653f540f8c_oClick on the image to enlarge the recipe.
Print on a 3 x 5 index card setting and store with the rest of your recipes.
For more recipe, visit the recipe index here!