anges de sucre

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anges de sucre

1 Holland Street
Kensington, London W8 4NA
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I’ve been to High Street Kensington a few times when I was looking at flats and meeting with letting
agents, though I never really had a peruse through the area. The more I walked, the more I realized
it seemed like the perfect place for me to be. So many corner flower stands, little boutiques and
neighborhood cafes. The quintessential neighborhood to tell you the truth. But it wasn’t until Monica
sent me a lovely box of sweet treats for my birthday that I actually decided to pay a visit to the
neighborhood just a mere 15-minutes walking distance from me!
 

{ages de sucre} via chevrons & éclairs
{ages de sucre} via chevrons & éclairs
{ages de sucre} via chevrons & éclairs
{ages de sucre} via chevrons & éclairs
 

sweet and delicate treats

And after falling in love with the flavor combinations of my birthday treats, I looked a little further
into Anges de Sucre and it was no surprise that the confectionary heaven has become one of the places
that I frequent for presents and a personal sweet fix. From truffle-like marshmallows called muffles,
macarons delicately filled, cakes topped with doughnuts and everything brightly hued… it’s the perfect
oasis for a sugar-loving person, like myself.
{ages de sucre} via chevrons & éclairs
{ages de sucre} via chevrons & éclairs
{ages de sucre} via chevrons & éclairs
{ages de sucre} via chevrons & éclairs
{ages de sucre} via chevrons & éclairs
{ages de sucre} via chevrons & éclairs

a tribute to design

What I love about little places like Anges de Sucre is the pure romance in the design. Something
that exudes personality, creativity, spunk and more. Dark granite set against brightly hued walls,
street-side windows adorned with towered cakes and macarons! The exterior mural of flowers and cute,
little macarons along with the mural on the juice counter was painted by Harriet Parry. The interior
mural done by Ceri of Olofson Design. It brightens the London gloom and the dark granite all so beautifully!
 

{ages de sucre} via chevrons & éclairs
{ages de sucre} via chevrons & éclairs
{ages de sucre} via chevrons & éclairs

select books, south africa

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select books

232 Long Street
Cape Town City Centre
Cape Town, South Africa 8001
+27 21 424 6955

The core of the country is infiltrated with such a rich history intertwined with a variety of adapted cultures that birthed a unique gastronomic culture, community of humble people, and the most dynamic country from east to west. Recently I started this new tradition, wherever I visit in the world, both near and far, I will pick up a cookbook to remind myself of the time spent in that particular place. And so when I was on the hunt for the perfect Cape Malay-inspired cookbook, I came across Select Books.
A cozy, little place with rare and out-of-print africana books…

{select books} via chevrons & éclairs
{select books} via chevrons & éclairs
{select books} via chevrons & éclairs
{select books} via chevrons & éclairs

in the midst of it all

And just like the rich history of the country it inhabits, Select Books has some historical treasures that are a must see!
From vintage maps to rugby memorabilia, to special photos of political events.
From books on art, geography, cooking, photography, the selection follows the trend of
sharing the true essence of the Africana culture and community.


{select books} via chevrons & éclairs {select books} via chevrons & éclairs
{select books} via chevrons & éclairs
{select books} via chevrons & éclairs
{select books} via chevrons & éclairs
{select books} via chevrons & éclairs
{select books} via chevrons & éclairs
{select books} via chevrons & éclairs
{select books} via chevrons & éclairs

north african pasta with orange-oregano olives

{north african pasta with orange-oregano marinated olives} via chevrons & éclairs

bringing eastern flavors to the west

I’ve been playing with all types of ingredients since moving to the UK. Frankly, I was playing with
all sorts since I had moved to St. Andrews. For a while I was sticking to a regimen that forced
me to eat some of the basics that I would back in the States and that probably wasn’t too great of
an idea. I wasn’t eating locally and wasn’t eating fresh. Despite the hassle of figuring out what
foods worked for me on a day-to-day basis, it was kind of like a treasure hunt.

The UK is a melting pot of flavors as its people come from all over the world. And so it only
seemed right to find exotic flavors. One spice mix I was introduced to whilst traveling through
the Middle East was ras-el-hanout. A North African spice blend that brings together the
earthiness of fennel, the spice of paprika, the sweetness from rose petals and the pungency of
other exotic spices. And so, we experimented…
{north african pasta with orange-oregano marinated olives} via chevrons & éclairs
{north african pasta with orange-oregano marinated olives} via chevrons & éclairs

taking the norm out of tradition

And it seems so natural to come up with a ragout that brings together sweet basil, aromatic rosemary
under the density of mince beef. So I started alternating the ingredients of the Italian ragout with
their North African-inspired equivalent. Keeping the tomato base the same, I replaced the herbs
and spices and the mince quite easily… The result was something quite different, quite
unique and quite tasty… in my humble opinion.
 

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{north african pasta with orange-oregano marinated olives} via chevrons & éclairs
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{north african pasta with orange-oregano marinated olives} via chevrons & éclairs

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northafricanpasta.001 You can right click on the recipe card to save directly to your computer.
Print on a 3 x 5 index card setting and store with the rest of your recipes.
For more recipe, visit the recipe index here!

volume six

{literary lust : volume 6} via chevrons & éclairs

chase your dreams…

styling & photography SUPAL DESAI book #GIRLBOSS BY SOPHIA AMORUSO
glasses c/o and in collaboration with SCARLETT OF SOHO

It was last November when I was sitting on my bed one very early morning, coffee gripped in one hand and a pencil in the other jotting notes of my blog trends and analytics. I received an email from a company that I thought was a promotional newsletter. But it read from the business development team of a reputable fashion house. At that moment, I knew I was going to be offered an unforgettable opportunity. From one meeting to the next, the scope of a project was developed. It turned out that my international relations, economics and fashion/blog background was something that can be intermingled. This gave rise to the idea of a consultancy as my humble opinions were more than just thoughts, but knowledge and facts.

After opening the doors to C&É Consultancy I was hungry for some guidance as starting my own business was never in my plans. It was something that just fell into my lap out of thin air, quite literally. My father, being a budding entrepreneur, gave me applicable advice and helped me hone my skills. My friend Adam gave me strategy guidance. Another friend, Andrew, navigated my nebulous understanding of the legal issues. Three men. So it only seemed necessary to find a woman that can understand my world.
 

{literary lust : volume 6} via chevrons & éclairs
{literary lust : volume 6} via chevrons & éclairs

there are secret opportunities hidden inside every failure

Despite the current legal qualms Nasty Gal is undergoing, Sophia Amoruso wrote a autobiography-like book that gives you the story behind Nasty Gal and all that she learned along the way. From opportunities to failures to confusion to just not knowing. Remember, I was entering the industry with no knowledge as to how I was going to run this business. On my own. In a foreign country. Amoruso’s story inspired me as she took each stride with courage.

A book that I think everyone should read to learn a few critical business essentials, independence and perseverance. I know with all the hype among the blog community, it almost seems like #Girlboss is a gimmick, but from someone who doesn’t particularly read for self-help purpose it was perfect. I found her tone and conversational style of writing to be comforting. Reassuring me to try new things, to take risks, to accept failure. It’s the perfect inspirational collection of pages for the modern working woman.

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get your copy of #Girlboss here

 

{literary lust : volume 6} via chevrons & éclairs
{literary lust : volume 6} via chevrons & éclairs

antonella abategiovanni | international development

{entering international development} via chevrons & éclairs

from desk to field

I met Antonella whilst backpacking through south of Spain and we easily connected on subjects
of international relations and development. At the time, she was grappling with falling in love with
her career in finance and was so inspired by the field of international development. She was,
at that time, looking for a way to connect her day job with development. Fast forward from 2009 to
today, she moved to London and we re-connected! It has been wonderful to have a friend back, and in
so close proximity! I’m honored to feature a friend who is making strides in the international development
field. So today, I decided to ask Antonella a few questions about how she took that leap of faith
from finance to development.

{PS} read a bit about international development here.
 

{entering international development} via chevrons & éclairs
{entering international development} via chevrons & éclairs

 
Give us a bit of background on your development education and career.

My background is pure financial, a Bachelor of Arts in Management of Financial Institutions and an MSc in Economics major in Banking and Finance. Like every Finance young graduate, my goal was to start my brilliant career in some of the major Banks worldwide. Well, I graduated in 2009 while the Economic crisis was hitting Europe (Yes! Very good timing) and, obviously I didn’t become a banker.

I started in a small fiduciary fund. I was progressing very fast, too fast for the age I was, so, during summer, I took the chance to go volunteer in Benin, Africa and that’s where my journey started.

Today, I hold an additional Master degree in Microfinance from the Universite LIbre de Bruxelles and I’m redirecting my career in development having worked for a microfinance institution in the Dominican Republic.

What peaked your interest in international development?

I wasn’t fully satisfied with my life. My inner was not happy. My parents, in the early 80s also went to Africa as volunteers. I grew up with pictures of the “other side” of the world, with a strong sense of give, do good, help. I’ve always been involved in caring initiatives but at some point it was not enough for me. I wanted to do more; I wanted to embrace the “doing good” philosophy getting up every morning and go to work. I wanted to work for this.

I always thought to get back and study international development but I was sorry for the years spent in Finance, I needed to combine both and that’s how I end up in Microfinance to be in line with my theory of ”gets also social returns from the good job you’ve done!”

 

{entering international development} via chevrons & éclairs

 
Do you have a specific region of interest or specialism?

A specific region…hmmm….The world. Jokes aside, there is so much to do that you can’t have a specific region of interest. Even here in Europe there’s a lot of work to be done. Sometimes your language skills decide for you, being proficient in Spanish I can comfortably work in Latin America. Africa captured my heart and I didn’t have the chance to go to Asia yet (really looking forward to!).

I meant to use ‘comfortably’ because we don’t have only think to our wishes but when we go abroad, same value for visiting, knowing the language opens a direct door to the hosting culture. When you work in development it gives you a key to understand better the real needs and also locals recognize you as less “stranger”.

Development is a massive field. I would say my area of interest is financial inclusion and everything turns around women and youth empowerment.

 

{entering international development} via chevrons & éclairs
{entering international development} via chevrons & éclairs
 

What made you decide to leave your day job to go to the Dominican Republic?
-Sun, white beaches, fruit, micro-finance…

What are some key tips about getting involved in international development?

If you plan to redirect your career or if you just approaching to get involved in international development you might like to:
– Networking with some credited professionals in the sector to get insights, learn from their experience.
– Read a lot about what’s going on in the market, everything is so vibrant and interesting and getting informed will give you an idea on what you pay more interest in, that’s what you’re passionate about.
– Be aware you share the same value of the institution you’d like to work for.
– Think out of the box and be ready to face challenges from limited budgets to poor internet connections and everything in the middle.

Follow you heart in this case is not only a cheese advice. Intuition combined with effort and dedication always repay back.

What kind of skills were you able to apply to your development career from your previous career in finance?

I was expecting the “what I’ve learned” question and the answer is to be patient. Back to the question I’ve actually been able to use all the expertise I learned from the past: credit risk analysis, basic accounting, marketing and strategy. Even some basics of Excel.

 

{entering international development} via chevrons & éclairs
 

Don’t be afraid. Listen. Commit. Make sure you easily adapt…
Rewarding opportunities are just outside our own comfort zone.

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